III. THEORY

Almost everyone agrees that the increasing ubiquity of cyberspace in all aspects of human activities has grown at rates far greater than our ability to understand and respond to its various implications. There is much about cyberspace that analysts of international relations do not know; and there is much about international relations that remains a mystery for computer scientists focusing on the cyber domain. Generally international relations and cyberspace are considered as separate areas of knowledge and practice, distinct features of the human experience, with little if any shared properties in theory or in practice. Increasingly, it is evident that they are becoming highly interconnected more rapidly than we are able to understand either the sources or consequences of linkage and connections. Figure below highlights that vision. The question mark at the center focuses on the area of ambiguity, uncertainty, and even lack of basic knowledge.

There is much about cyberspace that analysts of international relations do not know; and there is much about international relations that remains a mystery for the original as well as the current the computer scientists concerned with the architecture of the Internet. Undertaking and capturing the entanglements of the two domains that are shaping their new joint system amount to a fundamental challenge of relevance to everyone and everywhere.